Ben Carson’s Campaign Finance Chairman Resigns

<a href=http://www.apimages.com/metadata/Index/DEM-2016-Carson/c41ad3a38cf64c0cbd9c3c71f6006468/5/0>Matt Rourke</a>/AP

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Ben Carson’s struggling campaign for the Republican presidential nomination was dealt another blow on Thursday morning when his campaign finance chair resigned.

Dean Parker was responsible for spearheading the campaign’s finances, and took credit for increases in donations using unconventional techniques, such as promising to put the names of donors’ children on the inside of Carson’s campaign bus. Parker’s unusual tactics may have gone beyond thinking up creative fundraising incentives. The announcement of his resignation comes on the heels of a Politico report that Parker paid himself $20,000 per month and racked up unnecessary expenses.

Carson accepted Parker’s resignation, and released an official statement supporting his former finance chair.

“Dean has been a valued member of my campaign team and a trusted friend; I appreciate and honor Dean’s tireless efforts on behalf of saving America,” Carson said. “Our significant fundraising success has been due, in large part, to Dean’s dedication and commitment to ‘We the People.'”

Carson will be participating in Thursday night’s GOP debate, and is currently polling fourth in Iowa, the first state to vote in the nominating contest, according to an average of recent polls. 

 

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