Rick Perry Distances Himself From Prayer Rally Organizers

<a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/texasgovernor/5465715588/sizes/z/in/photostream/">Texas Governor Rick Perry</a>/Flickr

Let our journalists help you make sense of the noise: Subscribe to the Mother Jones Daily newsletter and get a recap of news that matters.


The Dallas Morning-News reports that Texas Governor Rick Perry is distancing himself from some of the participants and organizers of The Response, his August 4th prayer and fasting festival in Houston. As the likely GOP presidential candidate explained, “Just because you endorse me doesn’t mean I endorse everything that you say or do.”

That’s a pretty standard politician defense, and there’s usually a little bit of truth to it. But this kind of misses the point. Sure, the event’s organizers hold some wacky views (which we’ve written about here and here) but the larger point is that Perry is, by holding a rally at the organizers’ behest, is consciously aiding a religious movement that has a clear and consistent purpose to bring the “seven mountains”—family, religion, education, business, arts, media, and government—under the dominion of Christians. For the uninitiated, the Texas Observer‘s Forrest Wilder has a must-read piece on the New Apostolic Reformation—the religious movement behind The Response:

The movement’s top prophets and apostles believe they have a direct line to God. Through them, they say, He communicates specific instructions and warnings. When mankind fails to heed the prophecies, the results can be catastrophic: earthquakes in Japan, terrorist attacks in New York, and economic collapse. On the other hand, they believe their God-given decrees have ended mad cow disease in Germany and produced rain in drought-stricken Texas.

Their beliefs can tend toward the bizarre. Some consider Freemasonry a “demonic stronghold” tantamount to witchcraft. The Democratic Party, one prominent member believes, is controlled by Jezebel and three lesser demons. Some prophets even claim to have seen demons at public meetings. They’ve taken biblical literalism to an extreme. In Texas, they engage in elaborate ceremonies involving branding irons, plumb lines and stakes inscribed with biblical passages driven into the earth of every Texas county.

That’s a sampling. Perry, who has presented himself as a Moses figure leading Americans out of slavery at the hands of “Pharaoh” (i.e. big government), worked with movement leaders to plan The Response, and as Wilder explains, uses much of the same language when he talks about his goals. He’s not accountable for specific pastors’ views, on, say, Oprah (one participant believes she’s a forerunner to the Antichrist). But his involvement with the group goes much deeper than standard guilt by association.

DOES IT FEEL LIKE POLITICS IS AT A BREAKING POINT?

Headshot of Editor in Chief of Mother Jones, Clara Jeffery

It sure feels that way to me, and here at Mother Jones, we’ve been thinking a lot about what journalism needs to do differently, and how we can have the biggest impact.

We kept coming back to one word: corruption. Democracy and the rule of law being undermined by those with wealth and power for their own gain. So we're launching an ambitious Mother Jones Corruption Project to do deep, time-intensive reporting on systemic corruption, and asking the MoJo community to help crowdfund it.

We aim to hire, build a team, and give them the time and space needed to understand how we got here and how we might get out. We want to dig into the forces and decisions that have allowed massive conflicts of interest, influence peddling, and win-at-all-costs politics to flourish.

It's unlike anything we've done, and we have seed funding to get started, but we're looking to raise $500,000 from readers by July when we'll be making key budgeting decisions—and the more resources we have by then, the deeper we can dig. If our plan sounds good to you, please help kickstart it with a tax-deductible donation today.

Thanks for reading—whether or not you can pitch in today, or ever, I'm glad you're with us.

Signed by Clara Jeffery

Clara Jeffery, Editor-in-Chief

payment methods

We Recommend

Latest