Donald Trump and Rudy Giuliani Can’t Stop Spreading Kavanaugh-Related Conspiracy Theories

It’s been that kind of day. Already.

On Saturday, hours ahead of the Senate’s vote to confirm Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh, Donald Trump attacked anti-Kavanaugh protesters on Twitter, calling them “paid professional protesters who are handed expensive signs.”

Just yesterday, Trump referred to the victims of sexual assault who passionately confronted Sen. Jeff Flake (R-Ariz.) last week in an elevator as “elevator screamers” and accused them of being paid by billionaire George Soros. The messaged echoed a right-wing conspiracy theory pushed by National Review reporter John Fund. It’s been repeated by others, including Sen. John Cornyn (R-Texas) and Trump attorney Rudy Giuliani.

Meanwhile, Giuliani retweeted a message on Saturday from a Twitter user named Dee Thompson (@genesis35711): “Follow the money. I think Soros is the anti-Christ! He must go! Freeze his assets & I bet the protests stop.” 

The final Kavanaugh confirmation vote is scheduled to happen between and 4 and 5 p.m. Eastern.

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Clara Jeffery, Editor-in-Chief

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