Palin Stumps for Trump, and It Gets Weird

<a href=http://www.apimages.com/metadata/Index/GOP-2016-Trump/965b0e65fd0e4e78ab87f4f52e8ce30b/11/1>Mary Altaffer</a>/AP

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Fresh off her endorsement of the real estate mogul, Sarah Palin teamed up with Republican presidential front-runner Donald Trump for a campaign rally Wednesday in Tulsa, Oklahoma (or, according to press credentials provided by the Trump campaign, “Tusla,” Oklahoma). In her signature rambling style, the former Alaska governor delivered sweeping attacks of President Barack Obama, accusing him of wearing political correctness “like a suicide vest.” 

Trump, not to be outdone by his opening act, hammered Democratic candidate Bernie Sanders for being “a socialist, a communist,” repeatedly berated the camera crews for not panning to see how huge the crowd was, threw out several protesters, and, before leaving the stage, made his boldest promise yet of just how much winning America would experience under the leadership of a Trump administration.

“You people are going to get sick and tired of winning,” Trump said. “You’re going to say, ‘Please, please, President Trump, we can’t take this much victory. Please stop, we don’t want any more wins.’ And I’m going to say to you, ‘We’re going to win, I don’t care what you say.'”

Palin, meanwhile, appeared to use the Monday night arrest of her son Track, after he allegedly punched his girlfriend and child’s mother in the face and then threatened to shoot himself with an AR-15, to attack Obama. Palin slammed Obama for his alleged disregard for veterans like Track, who often experience difficulty after they return from combat.

“I can speak personally about this, I guess it’s the elephant in the room because my own family, going through what we’re going through today with my son, a combat vet in a striker brigade fighting for you all, America, in the war zone,” Palin said, to cheers. “But my son, like so many others, they come back a bit different, they come back hardened…and it makes me realize more than ever, it is now or never for the sake of America’s finest that we have that commander in chief who will respect them, and honor them.”

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