Bobby Jindal Really Wants You to Know He’s Been Working Out


One of the most underrated storylines of the 2016 election has been Louisiana Gov. Bobby Jindal’s ongoing effort to re-brand himself as a bodybuilder.

Last October, “a source close to Louisiana’s Bobby Jindal” leaked to National Review that the governor had gained 13 pounds over just a few months, an indication that he considered “being skinny” to be a weakness in the early Republican primary. In March, an MSNBC reporter tagged along with Jindal during a workout at a Manhattan gym. “Today’s legs, but every day I try to rotate it,” the governor explained before, presumably, flexing in front of the mirror and downing some brotein. And on Wednesday, BuzzFeed published a video it shot with Jindal in which he does push-ups for two minutes. It’s some real Rocky IV stuff:

But there’s something else going on here. On Tuesday, Texas Sen. Ted Cruz cooked and consumed “machine gun bacon” in a video produced by the website IJ Review. (Technically, it was more like semi-automatic-rifle bacon, and you shouldn’t try it at home.) Two weeks earlier, the same publication got Sen. Lindsey Graham (R-S.C.) to destroy his cell phone for its cameras, in response to Donald Trump publicly revealing his cell phone number. Jindal’s workout tape is part of a new genre of campaign journalism, in which media organizations are producing viral videos that the campaigns might otherwise have filmed themselves.

IJ Review, although only three years old, has forced itself to be taken seriously in Washington media. It will co-host a Republican primary debate with ABC News next year. BuzzFeed, an investigative reporting powerhouse in its own right, has delivered strong reporting on Jindal’s candidacy. But these videos are something different—a weird new form of native advertising.

What’s that Clickhole mantra? “Because all content deserves to go viral”? In 2016, the same can apparently be said of candidates. Even Bobby Jindal.

DOES IT FEEL LIKE POLITICS IS AT A BREAKING POINT?

Headshot of Editor in Chief of Mother Jones, Clara Jeffery

It sure feels that way to me, and here at Mother Jones, we’ve been thinking a lot about what journalism needs to do differently, and how we can have the biggest impact.

We kept coming back to one word: corruption. Democracy and the rule of law being undermined by those with wealth and power for their own gain. So we're launching an ambitious Mother Jones Corruption Project to do deep, time-intensive reporting on systemic corruption, and asking the MoJo community to help crowdfund it.

We aim to hire, build a team, and give them the time and space needed to understand how we got here and how we might get out. We want to dig into the forces and decisions that have allowed massive conflicts of interest, influence peddling, and win-at-all-costs politics to flourish.

It's unlike anything we've done, and we have seed funding to get started, but we're looking to raise $500,000 from readers by July when we'll be making key budgeting decisions—and the more resources we have by then, the deeper we can dig. If our plan sounds good to you, please help kickstart it with a tax-deductible donation today.

Thanks for reading—whether or not you can pitch in today, or ever, I'm glad you're with us.

Signed by Clara Jeffery

Clara Jeffery, Editor-in-Chief

payment methods

We Recommend

Latest