Ikea Recalling Dressers After Two Children Die from Falling Drawers


In February 2014, a two-year-old boy from Pennsylvania was killed after an Ikea Malm dresser tipped over and pinned him to his bed. In another incident in June of that year, a 23-month-old child died after being trapped beneath falling drawers from the same line of Ikea’s popular dressers.

The company is now offering a free repair kit to 27 million customers who purchased the company’s Malm dressers to help remove the furniture’s “tip-over hazard.”

The recall is in conjunction with a safety alert issued by the Consumer Product Safety Commission on Wednesday warning of the dressers’ potential dangers. The commission recommended that parents no longer buy Malm dressers taller than 23.5 inches for children and 29.5 inches for adults, unless the products are properly secured to a wall.

The free repair kits provide such an anchoring mechanism.

Malm Dresser, Ikea

The company said in total it received 14 accident reports stemming from the line’s drawers, four of which resulted in injuries.

In a statement, Ikea’s U.S. commercial manager Patty Lobell said the company was “deeply saddened” by the deaths and hoped its efforts would “prevent further tragedies.”

For information on how to receive the free repair kit, head over to the commission’s alert here.

DOES IT FEEL LIKE POLITICS IS AT A BREAKING POINT?

Headshot of Editor in Chief of Mother Jones, Clara Jeffery

It sure feels that way to me, and here at Mother Jones, we’ve been thinking a lot about what journalism needs to do differently, and how we can have the biggest impact.

We kept coming back to one word: corruption. Democracy and the rule of law being undermined by those with wealth and power for their own gain. So we're launching an ambitious Mother Jones Corruption Project to do deep, time-intensive reporting on systemic corruption, and asking the MoJo community to help crowdfund it.

We aim to hire, build a team, and give them the time and space needed to understand how we got here and how we might get out. We want to dig into the forces and decisions that have allowed massive conflicts of interest, influence peddling, and win-at-all-costs politics to flourish.

It's unlike anything we've done, and we have seed funding to get started, but we're looking to raise $500,000 from readers by July when we'll be making key budgeting decisions—and the more resources we have by then, the deeper we can dig. If our plan sounds good to you, please help kickstart it with a tax-deductible donation today.

Thanks for reading—whether or not you can pitch in today, or ever, I'm glad you're with us.

Signed by Clara Jeffery

Clara Jeffery, Editor-in-Chief

payment methods

We Recommend

Latest