Here Are the Court Records of the Restraining Order Against Alleged Texas Murderer Ronald Lee Haskell

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On Wednesday evening, Ronald Lee Haskell, disguised as a Fed-Ex delivery man, gained entry to the home of his sister-in-law and her spouse, Stephen and Katie Stay, demanding the whereabouts of his estranged ex-wife. Haskell would go on to shoot the Stays and their five children, killing everyone except his 15-year-old niece, and only surrendering to police after a three-and-a-half hour standoff.

In July of 2013, Haskell’s wife filed a protective order against him in Cache County, Utah, where they lived at the time. In October 2013, Haskell’s protective order was converted to a “mutual restraining order as part of their divorce and custody proceedings. This crucial step likely meant that Haskell was legally allowed to have guns again under both state and federal law.

Read the full docket of Haskell’s protective order proceedings below. Read the full details of the case, as well our analysis of domestic-violence-related gun laws here.

 

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