Nevada’s GOP Stopped Opposing Abortion and Same-Sex Marriage. Here’s What Happened Next.

<a href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/49814250@N07/4573030549/in/photolist-7Y6YEi-7Y6WXv-7Yabgd-7Ya9ts-7Y6QUK-7Y6M5r-7Y6HGD-eHRvhY-7Y6MCH-7Y6YpV-7Y6UtV-7YacFu-7Y6SVK-7Ya6jf-7Ya2do-7Y6Xgr-7Y6Qot-7Y6KgZ-7Y6JMn-7Y6QeB-7Y6Mdv-7Ya9cQ-7Y9ZUJ-7Y9Whq-7Y6QKF-7Y6GRp-7Ya7kQ-7Ya2DN-7Y6VCB-7Y6PjB-7Y6RKK-7Ya7Ad-7Y6Lni-7Y9XEh-7Ya2wQ-7Y6S4X-7Y9W9f-7Y6V7P-7Y6VPP-7Y6Pfz-7Y9Z63-7Y6UFx-7Ya7SG-7Y6Wdv-7Y6Prz-7Y9XNs-7Y6LGH-7Y6SSc-7Ya2Zm-7Y9ZKC">vtravelled.com</a>/Flickr

For indispensable reporting on the coronavirus crisis, the election, and more, subscribe to the Mother Jones Daily newsletter.


Last month, the Nevada GOP voted to strip opposition to abortion and marriage equality out of its official party platform. This really shouldn’t have come as a surprise to anyone who’d been paying attention: Brian Sandoval, the state’s Republican governor, is pro-choice and doesn’t want the state to defend its same-sex marriage ban in federal court. And even Bob Cashell, the 74-year-old, Texas-born, former truck driver who serves as the mayor of staunchly conservative Reno now backs marriage equality.

Even so, a lot of Republicans in other states are freaking out.

“The Nevada GOP action to remove marriage and life from their platform is a disgrace,” wrote Oklahoma Republican National Committee member Carolyn McLarty in a recent email to some 100 Republican National Committee delegates. “Both are direct attacks on God and family.”

But so far, Nevada’s GOP delegation stands by its decision. “Nevada is home to many diverse people, including a large LGBT population,” Nevada Republican National Committeewoman Diana Orrock wrote in a letter released on Friday at the RNC’s spring meeting in Memphis. “The GOP is by definition a party of inclusion not exclusion.… Excluding an entire group of American citizens based solely on their sexual preference towards the same gender is not only divisive but in the 21st century it is unacceptable.”

Anyway, so much for the idea of hosting the 2016 Republican National Convention in Las Vegas. It sure would have been fun.

DOES IT FEEL LIKE POLITICS IS AT A BREAKING POINT?

Headshot of Editor in Chief of Mother Jones, Clara Jeffery

It sure feels that way to me, and here at Mother Jones, we’ve been thinking a lot about what journalism needs to do differently, and how we can have the biggest impact.

We kept coming back to one word: corruption. Democracy and the rule of law being undermined by those with wealth and power for their own gain. So we're launching an ambitious Mother Jones Corruption Project to do deep, time-intensive reporting on systemic corruption, and asking the MoJo community to help crowdfund it.

We aim to hire, build a team, and give them the time and space needed to understand how we got here and how we might get out. We want to dig into the forces and decisions that have allowed massive conflicts of interest, influence peddling, and win-at-all-costs politics to flourish.

It's unlike anything we've done, and we have seed funding to get started, but we're looking to raise $500,000 from readers by July when we'll be making key budgeting decisions—and the more resources we have by then, the deeper we can dig. If our plan sounds good to you, please help kickstart it with a tax-deductible donation today.

Thanks for reading—whether or not you can pitch in today, or ever, I'm glad you're with us.

Signed by Clara Jeffery

Clara Jeffery, Editor-in-Chief

payment methods

We Recommend

Latest