Here’s Another High School Football Team Promoting the “Trail of Tears”


On Friday, the Dyersburg Trojans beat the visiting Jackson Northside Indians 34-14 to advance in the Tennessee high school football playoffs. But the game wasn’t without controversy: A Facebook page managed by the Dyersburg coaching staff proudly highlighted a half-dozen photos of Dyersburg students holding up a giant “Trail of Tears” banner to taunt the visiting Jackson Northside team.

Dyersburg principal Jon Frye said he was not aware of the photos on the football team’s Facebook page but would ask moderators to take them down. “I will be leaving here and going to the fieldhouse as soon as you and I are done,” he told Mother Jones on Wednesday. Sure enough, the photos have since been removed, but here’s a screenshot:

Dyersburg Trojans/Facebook

Frye, who did not attend the playoff game, said he became aware of the signs on Friday and met with students on Monday and hopes this will be the last of it. “Largely I tried to draw a parallel between persecuted population groups,” he said. “You would not take African Americans and try to draw a parallel to an event in which a lot of African American people had died.”

This is the second recent incident involving fans of a high school football team using “Trail of Tears” signs to taunt “Indian” opponents. That same Friday night, the principal of McAdory High School in McAlla, Alabama, was forced to apologize after his team took the field for their second-round playoff game against the Pinson Valley Indians by running through a paper sign reading “Hey Indians, get ready to leave in a trail of tears.”

The incidents come amid a renewed push by activists and lawmakers to persuade the Washington NFL franchise to change its name and logo to something less racially insensitive. On November 5, DC’s city council approved a resolution asking the team to change its name. Although supporters of such names say the names are intended to honor American Indian heritage, the lesson of Dyersburg and Jackson Northside may be just the opposite.

“I haven’t given that one a ton of thought, I know, but I guess you could make the logical connection if they weren’t named Indians then you couldn’t have this particular situation,” Frye said of the school’s opponent. “I suppose there’s some truth to that.”

DOES IT FEEL LIKE POLITICS IS AT A BREAKING POINT?

Headshot of Editor in Chief of Mother Jones, Clara Jeffery

It sure feels that way to me, and here at Mother Jones, we’ve been thinking a lot about what journalism needs to do differently, and how we can have the biggest impact.

We kept coming back to one word: corruption. Democracy and the rule of law being undermined by those with wealth and power for their own gain. So we're launching an ambitious Mother Jones Corruption Project to do deep, time-intensive reporting on systemic corruption, and asking the MoJo community to help crowdfund it.

We aim to hire, build a team, and give them the time and space needed to understand how we got here and how we might get out. We want to dig into the forces and decisions that have allowed massive conflicts of interest, influence peddling, and win-at-all-costs politics to flourish.

It's unlike anything we've done, and we have seed funding to get started, but we're looking to raise $500,000 from readers by July when we'll be making key budgeting decisions—and the more resources we have by then, the deeper we can dig. If our plan sounds good to you, please help kickstart it with a tax-deductible donation today.

Thanks for reading—whether or not you can pitch in today, or ever, I'm glad you're with us.

Signed by Clara Jeffery

Clara Jeffery, Editor-in-Chief

payment methods

We Recommend

Latest