Texas Police Chief Talking Gun Control When Officer Is Shot

Fort Worth Police Chief Jeffrey HalsteadFort Worth Police Department

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When Fort Worth Police Chief Jeffrey Halstead visited Capitol Hill last week to push for tighter gun control measures, he had some unwanted help from a felon back in Texas, the Fort Worth Star-Telegram reports:

At 5 p.m. Tuesday, Halstead was meeting with Sen. John Cornyn, R-Texas, in Washington, D.C., to discuss gun control concerns of the Major Cities Chiefs Association…

At that time, his concerns were being played out at a Haltom City auto shop, where one of his officers and personal friend—21-year veteran John Bell—was shot [in the head] by a convicted felon being pursued by Haltom City police.

This should serve as a compelling illustration of why our country needs tighter gun control laws. But then, so should the murder of 20 elementary schoolers by a maniac with an assault rifle—and we all know how far that has gone to sway people like Cornyn.

If anybody can change the minds of Republican senators, however, it’s probably somebody like Halstead, who represents a “cowboy town” in what’s arguably the most pro-gun state in America. “We almost see every week where we have officers being ambushed by people who have no right to possess those weapons,” Halstead told the Star-Telegram.

Halstead’s Major City Chiefs Association is part of a coalition of nine national police organizations that supports a ban on semi-automatic assault rifles and high-capacity magazines and advocates expanded background checks.

For more on what police officers think about gun control, read my story on how the NRA recruits cops with freebies paid for by gun companies.

 

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