Guy in Charge of Electing GOP Senators Hasn’t Been Following Pennsylvania Senate Race

<a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/gageskidmore/6877701671/sizes/z/in/photostream/">Gage Skidmore</a>/Flickr

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It seems that Sen. John Cornyn (R-Texas) doesn’t read much news.

On Tuesday afternoon at the Republican National Convention, I asked Cornyn what he thought of the controversy surrounding Pennsylvania Senate candidate Tom Smith, who compared being an unwed mother to being raped. I was wondering whether Cornyn thought Smith’s comments (which drew national headlines before his spokeswoman walked them back) might reduce the GOP’s chances of winning the seat. Cornyn is the chair of the National Republican Senatorial Committee (NRSC), which is charged with electing GOP senators, but he told me he “honestly hadn’t followed” the Smith controversy.

There are only a few possible explanations for this. Assuming Cornyn was telling the truth, and the NRSC is remotely competent, it suggests that the NRSC doesn’t think Smith has much of a chance of unseating Democratic incumbent Robert Casey Jr., who leads in the polls. If NRSC staff thought the race was competitive, they would have been monitoring it and would have alerted their boss when the GOP candidate made a deeply damaging, headline-grabbing gaffe. The fact that Cornyn seemed not to have heard of the controversy suggests his staff may think it doesn’t matter.

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