News Flash: Even Christians Hate Christian TV

<a href="http://www.shutterstock.com/pic-89124160/stock-vector-happy-christian-religion-christianity.html?src=csl_recent_image-1">graphica</a>/shutterstock.com

For indispensable reporting on the coronavirus crisis, the election, and more, subscribe to the Mother Jones Daily newsletter.


Pastor David Wright is the CEO of DOersTV.com, an online Christian reality TV network. He’s been using Facebook to do some research on his audience, and this week sent out a press release revealing his findings. No one who’s ever watched Christian TV will be especially shocked, but Wright declared himself “flabbergasted” to learn that even the vast majority of Christians who responded to his network’s Facebook fan page hate Christian TV. “I kind of expected there would be those Christians who thought Christian TV was too boring or not relevant for the times, but I never would have imagined the disdain thousands of Christians have for Christian TV,” Wright said in his release.

Fortunately, Wright was able to get to the source of the frustration. He says that the vast majority of Christians think that Christian TV is boring and that it features “Too much begging for money and fundraising telethons.” Another problem he identified is that Christians think Christian TV is full of ethically challenged “false prosperity teachers” manipulating people to give money. “Unfortunately, the greed for money has replaced the need for ministry among many of our ministers and Christian TV Networks. People are feed [sic] up with the lust for material things,” said Wright, noting that the overabundance of greedy religious figures on Christian TV was a big turn off for viewers. “We can’t have pastors indulging in sin and expect people not to be turned off.” Wright promises to take the information to heart: he’s declared a moratorium on telethons, so the devout can safely tune in to “Kingdom Building Today” or the oxymoronic “Christian Comedy Television” on his network without hearing that God thinks they should write the network a big check. Praise the lord! 

DOES IT FEEL LIKE POLITICS IS AT A BREAKING POINT?

Headshot of Editor in Chief of Mother Jones, Clara Jeffery

It sure feels that way to me, and here at Mother Jones, we’ve been thinking a lot about what journalism needs to do differently, and how we can have the biggest impact.

We kept coming back to one word: corruption. Democracy and the rule of law being undermined by those with wealth and power for their own gain. So we're launching an ambitious Mother Jones Corruption Project to do deep, time-intensive reporting on systemic corruption, and asking the MoJo community to help crowdfund it.

We aim to hire, build a team, and give them the time and space needed to understand how we got here and how we might get out. We want to dig into the forces and decisions that have allowed massive conflicts of interest, influence peddling, and win-at-all-costs politics to flourish.

It's unlike anything we've done, and we have seed funding to get started, but we're looking to raise $500,000 from readers by July when we'll be making key budgeting decisions—and the more resources we have by then, the deeper we can dig. If our plan sounds good to you, please help kickstart it with a tax-deductible donation today.

Thanks for reading—whether or not you can pitch in today, or ever, I'm glad you're with us.

Signed by Clara Jeffery

Clara Jeffery, Editor-in-Chief

payment methods

We Recommend

Latest