Harry Reid’s Health Care Ads

White House photo/<a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/whitehouse/3484813524/">Pete Souza</a> (<a href="http://www.usa.gov/copyright.shtml">Government Work</a>)

For indispensable reporting on the coronavirus crisis, the election, and more, subscribe to the Mother Jones Daily newsletter.


Harry Reid, the Democrats’ Senate Majority Leader, faces a tough reelection fight back in Nevada this fall. He’s in big trouble in the polls—TPM’s poll average has him trailing Sue Lowden, the likely GOP nominee, 52.6 percent to 38.3 percent. These are terrible numbers for an incumbent, and they mean Reid will probably lose. Nate Silver, the polling guru, gives the Republicans a nearly 80 percent chance of picking up the seat. All that said, it’s not over ’til it’s over. Reid has an immense war chest, and has threatened to spend as much as $25 million on the election. The Democrats will certainly pull out all the stops to save him. And now that health care reform has passed the House and the Senate and been signed into law, Reid has something big to run on. So (to borrow a Vegas-related phrase) he’s going all-in, running ads that tie him explicitly to health care reform. They’re actually pretty good:

Reid’s clearly counting on the passage of health care reform to help him get through his toughest reelection battle yet. He’s focusing on the aspects of reform that kick in right away—like the tax credits for small businesses that offer health insurance to their employees—and hoping people give him credit for making their lives a little bit easier. Expect to see a lot more messaging like this from Dems across the country as November draws near.

DOES IT FEEL LIKE POLITICS IS AT A BREAKING POINT?

Headshot of Editor in Chief of Mother Jones, Clara Jeffery

It sure feels that way to me, and here at Mother Jones, we’ve been thinking a lot about what journalism needs to do differently, and how we can have the biggest impact.

We kept coming back to one word: corruption. Democracy and the rule of law being undermined by those with wealth and power for their own gain. So we're launching an ambitious Mother Jones Corruption Project to do deep, time-intensive reporting on systemic corruption, and asking the MoJo community to help crowdfund it.

We aim to hire, build a team, and give them the time and space needed to understand how we got here and how we might get out. We want to dig into the forces and decisions that have allowed massive conflicts of interest, influence peddling, and win-at-all-costs politics to flourish.

It's unlike anything we've done, and we have seed funding to get started, but we're looking to raise $500,000 from readers by July when we'll be making key budgeting decisions—and the more resources we have by then, the deeper we can dig. If our plan sounds good to you, please help kickstart it with a tax-deductible donation today.

Thanks for reading—whether or not you can pitch in today, or ever, I'm glad you're with us.

Signed by Clara Jeffery

Clara Jeffery, Editor-in-Chief

We Recommend

Latest