Heads-Up On Health Care

White House photo.

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The rest of today promises to be big for health care reform. At 5:00 p.m., Sen. Harry Reid plans to explain the Senate’s merged health care bill to his Democratic colleagues at a caucus meeting. The bill will probably be unveiled to the public later in the evening, and the crucial Congressional Budget Office “score” of the bill—estimating its costs and benefits—is expected sometime today, too.

TPM’s Brian Beutler reports that Reid may adhere to the 72-hour rule for public comment on legislation before trying to pass a motion to proceed with debate—something that requires 60 votes and will be the first big test for the Senate bill. Beutler also reminds readers that a Republican stunt calling for reading the entire bill aloud is likely to delay actual debate until after senators return from next week’s Thanksgiving recess.

You can expect all sorts of ludicrous comments, misinformation, and silliness about the Senate bill all over cable television, the internet, and the print media starting, well, just about now.

DOES IT FEEL LIKE POLITICS IS AT A BREAKING POINT?

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It sure feels that way to me, and here at Mother Jones, we’ve been thinking a lot about what journalism needs to do differently, and how we can have the biggest impact.

We kept coming back to one word: corruption. Democracy and the rule of law being undermined by those with wealth and power for their own gain. So we're launching an ambitious Mother Jones Corruption Project to do deep, time-intensive reporting on systemic corruption, and asking the MoJo community to help crowdfund it.

We aim to hire, build a team, and give them the time and space needed to understand how we got here and how we might get out. We want to dig into the forces and decisions that have allowed massive conflicts of interest, influence peddling, and win-at-all-costs politics to flourish.

It's unlike anything we've done, and we have seed funding to get started, but we're looking to raise $500,000 from readers by July when we'll be making key budgeting decisions—and the more resources we have by then, the deeper we can dig. If our plan sounds good to you, please help kickstart it with a tax-deductible donation today.

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Signed by Clara Jeffery

Clara Jeffery, Editor-in-Chief

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