T. Boone Pickens Scraps Plan for Massive Wind Farm

used with creative commons license from flickr user floyduk

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T. Boone Pickens’ $10 billion plan to build the world’s largest wind farm on the Texas panhandle has been scrapped. The high-profile project had benefited from the “Pickens Plan” media blitz in the lead-up to the 2008 elections, when the oil tycoon spent millions on TV ads promoting natural gas and wind power.

Though Pickens was lauded in the media at the time as an environmental hero, I was among a few reporters who questioned his motivation for building the wind project. His early plans would have used a right-of-way for the windmills’ power lines to bring water from the Ogallala aquifer to cities downstate, draining a vast region of a fragile reserve. Pickens ultimately failed to find a buyer for the water, then faced a drop in energy prices due to the recession. In December, his Mesa Power LP put the wind project on hold before announcing last week that it would abandon it in favor of several smaller projects.

In making the announcement, Pickens cryptically cited problems associated with building his own power lines. It’s odd that he can’t tap those already being built to the Panhandle by the Texas Public Utility Commission. The Dallas Morning News reported that the lines “won’t follow a path that Mesa had suggested” but didn’t elaborate. Did Pickens’ power lines fail because they needed the accompanying water pipeline to be profitable? A spokeswoman for Pickens didn’t return a call.

 

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