White House Invites Right-Wingers to Discuss Abortion Reduction

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Right Wing Watch notes the White House has invited anti-abortion representatives from the religious right to a meeting next Tuesday with Josh DuBois, head of the Office of Faith-Based and Neighborhood Partnerships, to discuss ways to reduce abortions. Among those attending will be Tom McClusky of the Family Research Council and Wendy Wright, president of Concerned Women for America.

That’s the same Wendy Wright who has declared that President Obama and Congress are “more hostile to unborn children, to marriage, to religious freedom, to free speech, to protecting our country than has ever existed in our history.” And when Obama lifted the ban on Federally funded stem cell research, Wright blasted the move, saying it “financially benefits those seeking to strip morality from science. It is politics at its worst.”

Considering Wright’s disparaging rhetoric—and similarly critical comments from other Evangelical groups—their invitation to meet with the White House puzzled me: The pro-life stance offers very little, if any, middle ground. Why, then, include pro-life hardliners in a discussion on abortion reduction?

At the very least, the move demonstrates Obama’s commitment to listening to and talking with the opposition. It also further distances Obama’s administration from George Bush, who never reached out similarly to representatives of groups with views as hostile toward his positions. As a spokesman for NARAL told me via email, “Unless you count getting thrown off the grounds of the FDA for trying to deliver petitions on birth-control access, then no, we were never invited to meet with the Bush administration.”

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