Actor’s Racism on Fox Makes Even Anchors Squeamish

For indispensable reporting on the coronavirus crisis, the election, and more, subscribe to the Mother Jones Daily newsletter.


Brad Garrett, the 6’8″ costar of Everbody Loves Raymond, apparently doesn’t love everybody. Especially Fox anchor Steve Doocy. And black people. And lesbians.

In an after-show special from his appearance on Fox and Friends, Garrett managed to offend just about everyone on set with his “comedy,” even the black cameraman, and the blonde make-up artist who had the audacity to act like a “proper white woman” when Garrett accused her of drinking on the job and having sex with the cameraman in a van.

Garrett’s offensive tirade prompted Doocy to call the moment Fox’s “most offensive interview ever” and tell Garrett that “I just don’t appreciate you making fun of people in such a personal way. People who are total strangers not in the public eye.” Doocy, by the way, slammed Obama for attending a “madrassa” and having the middle name Hussein. He’s also been seriously misinformed about a number of issues, from the US Code to Sarah Palin being a foreign policy expert. But this latest incident makes me think a tiny, little bit better of him. Maybe defending his co-hosts and crew from racist, misogynist attacks is part of those “small-town values” Republicans are always talking about. Or maybe he just didn’t like being upstaged.

DOES IT FEEL LIKE POLITICS IS AT A BREAKING POINT?

Headshot of Editor in Chief of Mother Jones, Clara Jeffery

It sure feels that way to me, and here at Mother Jones, we’ve been thinking a lot about what journalism needs to do differently, and how we can have the biggest impact.

We kept coming back to one word: corruption. Democracy and the rule of law being undermined by those with wealth and power for their own gain. So we're launching an ambitious Mother Jones Corruption Project to do deep, time-intensive reporting on systemic corruption, and asking the MoJo community to help crowdfund it.

We aim to hire, build a team, and give them the time and space needed to understand how we got here and how we might get out. We want to dig into the forces and decisions that have allowed massive conflicts of interest, influence peddling, and win-at-all-costs politics to flourish.

It's unlike anything we've done, and we have seed funding to get started, but we're looking to raise $500,000 from readers by July when we'll be making key budgeting decisions—and the more resources we have by then, the deeper we can dig. If our plan sounds good to you, please help kickstart it with a tax-deductible donation today.

Thanks for reading—whether or not you can pitch in today, or ever, I'm glad you're with us.

Signed by Clara Jeffery

Clara Jeffery, Editor-in-Chief

payment methods

We Recommend

Latest