MoJo Nukes Convo: Judith Lewis Highlights

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judith-headshot.jpgJudith Lewis, author of our May/June 2008 feature “The Nuclear Option,” has been writing about nuclear energy-related issues for some time. While she has some safety concerns about nuclear power, she says that if we are as concerned about carbon in the environment as we say we are, then we cannot afford to ignore the relatively carbon-free electricity nuclear plants provide. At the same time, she says, “while we consider it, we also have to understand that the nuclear industry also has a lot of problems associated with it.”

The main problems, as Lewis sees them, are the radioactive waste produced by nuclear power, the industry’s faulty monitoring agency, and a geologic waste repository built on top of an active fault line. In the end, Lewis says, “only public participation can force industry and government regulators to do their jobs right.”

Here are some of Judith Lewis’s key comments from last week’s Blue Marble expert-moderated reader conversation:
“On greenhouse gas emissions alone, nuclear energy does very well. While coal-fired electricity generation emits around 900 kg of CO2 per megawatt-hour of electricity generated, nuclear leaves us with only 16 to 55 kg CO2 per MWh (that’s including mining, milling, enrichment, plant construction, waste disposal—the whole deal)…whether the pros outweight the cons really does depend on how urgently worried we are about catastrophic climate change.”

“The notion that coal releases more radioactivity than nuclear is a popular one in with the nuclear industry right now, but I’m not sure it’s their soundest argument. Many coal plants were built before we knew enough to put buffer zones between them and residential communities, so people live closer to whatever radioactivity they release. We do know that 24,000 people die a year because of pollution from coal-fired power plants…and then there’s the carbon.”

“I notice that this discussion swings wildly between extremes (Nuclear has no environmental impact! Solar is the only way! Nuclear will save the world!), but I suspect the real answers lie somewhere in the middle.”

Our readers also had some words for Judith. Below are a few highlights:
“Judith: Thank you for your response that included the numerical data from nuclear fuel cycle studies. It is nice to see someone who thinks and recognizes that facts and figures matter more than vague generalizations.”—Rod Adams

“Coal plants cause ~24,000 deaths annually, in addition to being the largest single source of global warming. Nuclear plants have no measurable impact (~0 deaths) and have a negligible global warming impact. Even the worst possible accident/meltdown event that could occur at a Western reactor would cause far fewer deaths than US coal plants do ANNUALLY.”—Jim Hopf

“There is a reason there seems to be little middle ground in these nukes versus renewables debates (of which this one seems fairly typical) which is that there really isn’t any. I don’t see a “mix” of nukes and renewables as being desirable because of the horrifying killing power of atomic energy, both weapons and reactors. And since I agree with Al Gore that nuke power is not a solution to global warming, I am opposed to any and all of them.”—Harvey Wasserman

Read the full conversation here.

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