Reality Check From Bali

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This Washington Post article conveys in short and sweet style how serious the U.S.’s refusal in Bali to accept emissions caps is.

Europe: frustrated, vowing to boycott Bush’s distracter tactic, the “major economies” meetings he’s hosting on global warming. Brazil—home to the world’s largest intact forest—threatening not to comply with rules that only apply to developing countries.

Most disturbing of all, Americans support carbon emissions caps because they’re the only way of fending off catastrophic climate change.

As Connie Hedegaard, Denmark’s minister for climate and energy, put it, the targets don’t come from “figures taken at random,” she said. Rather, the 25 percent by 2020 “reports very specifically back to what the IPCC tells us.”

Compare the sanity of that remark—we’re doing what the best scientists tell us we have to—to the childish churlishness of this one, made by James L. Connaughton, chair of the White House Council on Environmental Quality, explaining why the U.S. refuses to do the right thing and accept the caps: “We will lead. The U.S. will lead. But leadership also requires others to fall in line and follow.”

Despite Americans’ political will, our government is standing in the way of the best documented solution for the greatest problem the world has ever faced.

DOES IT FEEL LIKE POLITICS IS AT A BREAKING POINT?

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It sure feels that way to me, and here at Mother Jones, we’ve been thinking a lot about what journalism needs to do differently, and how we can have the biggest impact.

We kept coming back to one word: corruption. Democracy and the rule of law being undermined by those with wealth and power for their own gain. So we're launching an ambitious Mother Jones Corruption Project to do deep, time-intensive reporting on systemic corruption, and asking the MoJo community to help crowdfund it.

We aim to hire, build a team, and give them the time and space needed to understand how we got here and how we might get out. We want to dig into the forces and decisions that have allowed massive conflicts of interest, influence peddling, and win-at-all-costs politics to flourish.

It's unlike anything we've done, and we have seed funding to get started, but we're looking to raise $500,000 from readers by July when we'll be making key budgeting decisions—and the more resources we have by then, the deeper we can dig. If our plan sounds good to you, please help kickstart it with a tax-deductible donation today.

Thanks for reading—whether or not you can pitch in today, or ever, I'm glad you're with us.

Signed by Clara Jeffery

Clara Jeffery, Editor-in-Chief

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