A Meat-and-Potatoes Kind of Candidate

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ad891.jpgFrom an AP list of fun facts about presidential hopefuls, Grist has culled candidates’ culinary preferences, which, by and large, don’t include veggies.

This, in and of itself, is not surprising. I mean, everyone knows that only girls like vegetables, and confessing your love for green beans is basically tantamount to admitting you’re a little too in touch with your feminine side. You might as well get it over with and say your favorite sport is figure skating. But the extent to which the candidates shun the greens in favor of hunks o’ red meat borders on the absurd. Witness the republicans’ favorite foods to cook:

Giuliani: Hamburgers or steak on the grill.

Huckabee: Ribeye steak on the grill.

McCain: Baby-back ribs.

Romney: Hot dog.

But my very favorite response is buried in the middle of the piece, in the section where candidates name their least favorite foods. Huckabee, it turns out, hates carrots. I mean, he really hates carrots:

Huckabee: “Carrots. I just don’t like carrots. I banned them from the governor’s mansion when I was governor of Arkansas because I could.”

Now that’s a manly move if ever there was one. Compared to the carrot proclamation, Edwards’ response looks awfully milquetoast:

Edwards: “I can’t stand mushrooms. I don’t want them on anything that I eat. And I have had to eat them because you get food served and it’s sitting there and you’re starving, so you eat.”

So he’s going to choke down the offending mushrooms without a fight? Then who, under Edwards’ watch, may I ask, is going to save America from emasculating veggies? This could be trouble.

—Kiera Butler

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