Texas Science Curriculum Director Resigns Over Creationism Kerfuffle

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creation190.jpgThe science blogosphere is abuzz (here, here and here, for starters) with some juicy creationism news from Texas. According to the Austin American-Statesman, Chris Comer, the state’s director of science curriculum, was pressured into resigning this month. Her crime? Forwarding an e-mail about an upcoming talk by creationism expert Barbara Forrest. (Now mind you, by “creationism expert,” I don’t mean “creationist.” Barbara Forrest testified in the Dover trial, and according to Pharyngula blogger PZ Meyers, she had creationists shaking in their boots.)

Anyway, long story short, the Texas Education Agency (TEA) had a fit. A TEA memo obtained by the Statesman said, “Ms. Comer’s e-mail implies endorsement of the speaker and implies that TEA endorses the speaker’s position on a subject on which the agency must remain neutral.”

Now, never mind the fact that the neutrality for which Texas strives on the subject of creationism pretty much amounts to bad science. Even if neutrality is your goal—heck, even if you’re the biggest creationist ever—you might still be interested in hearing what this Barbara Forrest has to say. And if you’re a teacher, you’re ostensibly interested in open forums, free exchange of ideas, etc. Tough luck for you if you’re teaching in Texas. Talk about a hostile learning environment.

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