Chevron Releases Video Game

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Energyville is like Sim City where the laws are written by Chevron. You must power your city with a mix of energy sources, and, of course, you can’t win without oil. The game is part of Chevron’s “Will you join us?” campaign, a dubious effort to spark dialogue about energy and the environment. I can’t imagine who Chevron sees as its target audience—kids will find the game all too 1997; any adult who buys the pitch might also be interested in a REQUEST FOR URGENT BUSINESS ASSISTANCE from Nigeria. Still, the game is getting lots of press.

Driven by novelty and interactivity–never underestimate the interest of bored office workers–advergames are becoming hot marketing tools in the political realm. The outfit Persuasive Games will whip one up for $40,000, complete with Sim City street grids or flash-animated conveyor belts. My favorite is Airport Security, a game in which you’re a TSA baggage screener. (Courtesy announcement: “Please be advised: Security personnel are authorized to use groping.”) For other examples, see page 86 of the Sept/Oct issue of Mother Jones.

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