Rumsfeld’s “Poor Memory”

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So back in April of last year, two investigators from the Pentagon’s inspector general paid Donald Rumsfeld a little visit to ask him about “the largest defense procurement scandal in recent decades.” Nothing major, just a few questions here and there. The usual. Here’s how the interview went, according to the Washington Post:

Rumsfeld cited poor memory, loose office procedures, and a general distraction with “the wars” in Iraq and Afghanistan to explain why he was unsure how his department came to nearly squander $30 billion leasing several hundred new tanker aircraft that its own experts had decided were not needed…

[A] copy of the transcript [of the Rumsfeld interview], obtained recently by The Washington Post under the Freedom of Information Act after a year-long wait, says a lot about how little of Rumsfeld’s attention has been focused on weapons-buying—a function that consumes nearly a fifth of the $410 billion defense budget, exclusive of expenditures in Iraq and Afghanistan.

Yeah, what’s a few billion dollars anyway? Lucky for us we have a “CEO President” at the helm to make sure everything’s running smoothly…

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