Not So Humane Society

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“The Humane Society of the Tennessee Valley values and protects all animals … by caring for the stray and outcast, by shielding the beaten and abused, by comforting the sick and injured, by educating and advocating so that the suffering might end.” Yeah, tell that to the homeless pets unlucky enough to end up there.

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Here at one of the oldest Humane Society shelters in the country, local veterinary students used shelter animals for drug experiments which left some of the hapless strays vomiting, drooling, and seizing, according to the ASSOCIATED PRESS.

“We don’t think it is something that a Humane Society should be doing,” said John Snyder, companion animal program director at the national headquarters. “It undermines the whole theory of sanctuary, safety, and shelter.”

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Clara Jeffery, Editor-in-Chief

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