Lunchtime Photo

Today is a travel day as we finally fly home. I wonder if that Trump guy is still president? Have the Dodgers won the Stanley Cup yet? Is it still the temperature of molten lava in Southern California? I guess I’ll find out when we land.

To keep you amused, here’s a gallery of photos from the famous Long Room library at Trinity College in Dublin. Despite my mini-rant about museums on Monday, I have to say that the attitude toward photography sure has changed for the better from ten years ago. Not just in museums, either. Basically, you can take pictures almost anywhere these days, and even the places that nominally forbid photography don’t really seem to care much. Maybe the rising army of smartphones finally caused everyone to give up.

Here’s the Long Room itself. I didn’t bother taking a good, basic establishing shot of the room since there are already hundreds of great pictures easily accessible on the web. Here’s one of them, available via Creative Commons from Diliff.

The Bible section. I found it by accident:

The famous busts lining the bookshelves:

Opera! But not the singing kind. According to a reader, “They appear to be volumes containing the collected works (opera in Latin) of St. Robert Bellarmine, a leading figure of the Counter-Reformation.”

The upper tier:

A creepy-loooking set of books. This is not a black-and-white photo. It just looks like one:

DOES IT FEEL LIKE POLITICS IS AT A BREAKING POINT?

Headshot of Editor in Chief of Mother Jones, Clara Jeffery

It sure feels that way to me, and here at Mother Jones, we’ve been thinking a lot about what journalism needs to do differently, and how we can have the biggest impact.

We kept coming back to one word: corruption. Democracy and the rule of law being undermined by those with wealth and power for their own gain. So we're launching an ambitious Mother Jones Corruption Project to do deep, time-intensive reporting on systemic corruption, and asking the MoJo community to help crowdfund it.

We aim to hire, build a team, and give them the time and space needed to understand how we got here and how we might get out. We want to dig into the forces and decisions that have allowed massive conflicts of interest, influence peddling, and win-at-all-costs politics to flourish.

It's unlike anything we've done, and we have seed funding to get started, but we're looking to raise $500,000 from readers by July when we'll be making key budgeting decisions—and the more resources we have by then, the deeper we can dig. If our plan sounds good to you, please help kickstart it with a tax-deductible donation today.

Thanks for reading—whether or not you can pitch in today, or ever, I'm glad you're with us.

Signed by Clara Jeffery

Clara Jeffery, Editor-in-Chief

We Recommend

Latest