Trump’s Management Style Reminds Me of Someone…

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The New York Times reports on the infighting at the White House:

Mr. Trump is not bothered by turf battles in his administration. He believes they foster competition and keep any one aide from accumulating too much power. He is even more enthusiastic about waging war publicly, believing that it fires up his white working-class base.

Meanwhile, the Washington Post reports on on the political appointees ensconced in each cabinet department to make sure everyone stays loyal to President Trump:

At the Pentagon, they’re privately calling the former Marine officer and fighter pilot who’s supposed to keep his eye on Defense Secretary Jim Mattis “the commissar,” according to a high-ranking defense official with knowledge of the situation. It’s a reference to Soviet-era Communist Party officials who were assigned to military units to ensure their commanders remained loyal.

I have read frequently about both of these practices, which often go together. They are popular among vicious, paranoid autocrats. I don’t believe I’ve ever read about this combination in a leader who is both admired and respected. Just sayin’.

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