David Brooks vs. David Brooks

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David Brooks three weeks ago on the Republican obstructionists who derailed the debt ceiling talks:

The members of this movement do not accept the logic of compromise….The members of this movement do not accept the legitimacy of scholars and intellectual authorities….The members of this movement have no sense of moral decency….The members of this movement have no economic theory worthy of the name.

….If the debt ceiling talks fail, independents voters will see that Democrats were willing to compromise but Republicans were not. If responsible Republicans don’t take control, independents will conclude that Republican fanaticism caused this default. They will conclude that Republicans are not fit to govern.

And they will be right.

Brooks sees the light! Hooray! Unless, um, he changes his mind. Cue Brooks tonight:

Alas, the dream of a Grand Bargain died Friday evening for three reasons. First, it was always going to be difficult to round up the necessary Congressional votes….Second, the White House negotiating process was inadequate….Third, the president lost his cool.

….There has been an outbreak of sanity since Congress took control….This should be a humbling moment for the White House, and maybe a learning experience. There are other people who have been around Washington a long time. They know how to play this game.

Just yesterday I was telling a friend who likes Brooks that I’m not a Brooks hater. I’m still not. But honest to God, I’ve never seen a columnist who’s so schizophrenic. One day we’ve failed because Republicans are just shy of insane, the next we’ve failed because Obama screwed up the negotiating process. It’s like some part of him rebels whenever he finally admits to himself what the modern conservative movement has become. I wonder what it will take for him to finally figure it out for good?

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