Fun and Games on Capitol Hill

For indispensable reporting on the coronavirus crisis, the election, and more, subscribe to the Mother Jones Daily newsletter.


My Twitter feed was full of tweets this morning about a House vote on a budget proposal from the Republican Study Committee, but I didn’t really understand what was going on and didn’t tune in to C-SPAN to find out. But it turns out this was a pretty entertaining vote. The RSC budget is even more right-wing than Paul Ryan’s framework, and this morning an amendment was proposed to adopt the RSC budget. Normally it would lose easily because a handful of Republicans would join the entire Democratic caucus in voting no. But Dems decided to vote “present” instead. Steve Benen picks up the story:

Most Republicans were inclined to support the truly insane RSC proposal, but with so many Dems voting “present,” there was a very real chance that the RSC plan would actually pass — and it, not Paul Ryan’s plan, would be the approved budget plan for the House.

And it nearly worked. Many Republicans who’d voted for the RSC plan had to scramble to switch their votes and avoid a huge embarrassment. Indeed, the result itself was still pretty embarrassing — there are 176 members of the Republican Study Committee, but only 119 Republicans voted for the RSC’s plan.

For Congress watchers, this was quite a bit more drama than we’re accustomed to seeing. David Kurtz noted that “chaos erupted” on the House floor, while The Hill said the final minutes of the vote “were characterized by shouting more typical of the British parliament than the U.S. Congress.”

Isn’t democracy wonderful?

DOES IT FEEL LIKE POLITICS IS AT A BREAKING POINT?

Headshot of Editor in Chief of Mother Jones, Clara Jeffery

It sure feels that way to me, and here at Mother Jones, we’ve been thinking a lot about what journalism needs to do differently, and how we can have the biggest impact.

We kept coming back to one word: corruption. Democracy and the rule of law being undermined by those with wealth and power for their own gain. So we're launching an ambitious Mother Jones Corruption Project to do deep, time-intensive reporting on systemic corruption, and asking the MoJo community to help crowdfund it.

We aim to hire, build a team, and give them the time and space needed to understand how we got here and how we might get out. We want to dig into the forces and decisions that have allowed massive conflicts of interest, influence peddling, and win-at-all-costs politics to flourish.

It's unlike anything we've done, and we have seed funding to get started, but we're looking to raise $500,000 from readers by July when we'll be making key budgeting decisions—and the more resources we have by then, the deeper we can dig. If our plan sounds good to you, please help kickstart it with a tax-deductible donation today.

Thanks for reading—whether or not you can pitch in today, or ever, I'm glad you're with us.

Signed by Clara Jeffery

Clara Jeffery, Editor-in-Chief

We Recommend

Latest