TV’s Bleak But Bright Future

For indispensable reporting on the coronavirus crisis, the election, and more, subscribe to the Mother Jones Daily newsletter.

Reihan Salam links today to a post by UCLA sociologist Gabriel Rossman on the future of television if the cable universe moves to a la carte pricing. Long story short, simple economics suggests that we’ll all cut back on the number of channels we subscribe to, which in turn means that we’ll end up with both (a) fewer channels and (b) channels with lower production values. I’ve long thought this was pretty obviously true, and it’s what’s made me sort of a mushy supporter of a la carte pricing. Still, a supporter I am, and Reihan suggests what will happen if/when this comes to pass:

But this could mean that U.S. viewers will consume more entertainment that is peer-produced, produced overseas, or by institutions that otherwise work outside of the WGA and SAG structure. Quality writing is of course very important, but perhaps quality writers will attach themselves to hyper-realistic animation projects, etc. No more actors! Or rather a somewhat smaller cadre of actors who focus primarily on screen-capture work, and who make middle-class wages rather than outsized sums. There are many, many ways this phenomenon could play out.

Italics mine. For what it’s worth, this is what I think is going to happen in the medium term. I’m not sure just how distant this is, but I don’t think we’re too far away from an era where a single person — or perhaps a small team — can create high-quality, 100% CGI shows that are virtually the equal of what you see today on network TV. Think xtranormal.com but with supercomputers and a crack creative team. Basically, you’ll need some good scriptwriters and a few good designers and that’s it. Brave new world, eh?

DOES IT FEEL LIKE POLITICS IS AT A BREAKING POINT?

Headshot of Editor in Chief of Mother Jones, Clara Jeffery

It sure feels that way to me, and here at Mother Jones, we’ve been thinking a lot about what journalism needs to do differently, and how we can have the biggest impact.

We kept coming back to one word: corruption. Democracy and the rule of law being undermined by those with wealth and power for their own gain. So we're launching an ambitious Mother Jones Corruption Project to do deep, time-intensive reporting on systemic corruption, and asking the MoJo community to help crowdfund it.

We aim to hire, build a team, and give them the time and space needed to understand how we got here and how we might get out. We want to dig into the forces and decisions that have allowed massive conflicts of interest, influence peddling, and win-at-all-costs politics to flourish.

It's unlike anything we've done, and we have seed funding to get started, but we're looking to raise $500,000 from readers by July when we'll be making key budgeting decisions—and the more resources we have by then, the deeper we can dig. If our plan sounds good to you, please help kickstart it with a tax-deductible donation today.

Thanks for reading—whether or not you can pitch in today, or ever, I'm glad you're with us.

Signed by Clara Jeffery

Clara Jeffery, Editor-in-Chief

payment methods

We Recommend

Latest