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Apparently one of the ministers in Binyamin Netanyahu’s government is tired of pussyfooting around with the United States.  If we insist on a halt to settlements in the West Bank, he says, Israel should fight back.  Eric Martin passes along the following report from the Jerusalem Post:

The minister suggests reconsidering military and civilian purchases from the US, selling sensitive equipment that the Washington opposes distributing internationally, and allowing other countries that compete with the US to get involved with the peace process and be given a foothold for their military forces and intelligence agencies.

[Yossi] Peled said that shifting military acquisition to America’s competition would make Israel less dependent on the US. For instance, he suggested buying planes from the France-based Airbus firm instead of the American Boeing.

Italics mine. This ought to go over real well. If relations between Obama and Netanyahu were a little chilly before, this ought to send them into clearly polar territory.

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