Newark Gets It Together in Response to Homicides; New Orleans, Not So Much

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The Newark mayor’s office has raised more than $3 million for a state-of-the-art surveillance system within days of the slaying of three college students. The homicides, which brought the 2007 citywide total up to 60, inspired political foes to make friends and corporations to make donations, all in the name of mitigating the alarming levels of violence in their city.

Meanwhile, no such strides have been made in New Orleans, where in the first four days of this year, seven people were murdered. By Saint Patrick’s Day, 37. With less than half of the city’s population around, the odds of getting killed in New Orleans made it the deadliest city in America.

A few months after I moved out of New Orleans last year, someone was shot with an assault rifle on the very corner on which I stood waiting for the bus every day. Hopefully the situation in Newark will inspire a certain mayor’s office on the Gulf Coast, too, in a city in which there have been twice as many murders—literally, 120 so far this year—among a population less tens of thousands. Hopefully it’ll happen soon, before more good and desperately needed New Orleanians, evacuating from a different kind of threat, move out.

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Clara Jeffery, Editor-in-Chief

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